Japanese

Evaluating Implementation of the NPT 13+2 Steps:

JAPANfS REPORT CARD

ON NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT

April 18, 2003  

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NPT 13+2 Steps

2002

2003 2004 2005

1

Early Entry into Force of the CTBT

D

B

2

Moratorium on Nuclear Weapons Tests

D

D

3

A Program of Work at the CD to Conclude the FMCT Within Five Years

B

B

4

 A Program of Work to Establish a Subsidiary Body to Deal with Nuclear Disarmament in the CD

C

D

5

 The Principle of Irreversibility

E

E

6

 An Unequivocal Undertaking by the Nuclear-Weapon States to Accomplish the Total Elimination of their Nuclear Arsenals.

E

E

7

 The Preservation and Strengthening of the ABM Treaty and the Promotion of the START Process

E

-

8

 The Completion and Implementation of the Trilateral Initiative between the US, Russia and the IAEA

D

D

9

 "International Stability" and the "Principle of Undiminished Security for All"

D

D

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  a. Unilateral Cuts in Nuclear Arsenals

D

D

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  b. Increasing Transparency

D

E

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  c. Reductions in Non-Strategic Nuclear Weapons

D

D

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  d. Reducing Operational Status

D

E

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  e. A Diminishing Role for Nuclear Weapons in Security Policies

E

E

  f. The Engagement of All Nuclear-Weapon States in a Process Leading to @the Elimination of Nuclear Weapons

D

D

10

 The Placement of Excess Fissile Material under International Control and its Use for Peaceful Purposes

D

C

11

 General and Complete Disarmament as the Ultimate Objective

E

C

12

 Regular Reports on the Implementation of the Obligation of Nuclear Disarmament Recalling the ICJ's Advisory Opinion

D

D

13

 The Further Development of Verification Capabilities

D

D

+1

 Legally Binding Negative Security Assurances

D

E

+2

 Establishment of Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zones

D

C
Average D D


l        From a Japanese citizensf perspective, we have assessed the Japanese governmentfs efforts from February 17, 2002 to February 16, 2003 implementation of the 13+2 steps. These are the thirteen practical steps implemented in article VI, plus two steps which are deeply connected to Japan among the steps within article VII, contained in the Final Document of 2000 Review Conference of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) that was adopted in May 2000.

l        We have set forth several gtasksh for each step, which are seen as paramount within the current state of intentional affairs and that Japan can possibly achieve. The TASKs will differ from year to year according to changes that occur within the political and military state of affairs. Among these gtasksh, we have identified the gimportant tasksh which should be given particular attention. We have based this gimportanceh on the belief of achieving the early elimination of nuclear weapons, the relevant international and Japanese political environments. We have given grades from A to E, based on our consideration of the Japanese governmentfs efforts to achieve the gtasksh we have outlined in the chart below.

l        The attached appendix gReasons for the Evaluationh explains in detail the criteria for the tasks that we have set and the grounds for the evaluation.

l        The issuance of the Report Card will continue every year until 2005, when the next NPT Review Conference will be held.

The evaluation was made by the Evaluation Committee, consisting of the following ten members.

(In alphabetical order)

HIRAOKA Takashi   Former Mayor of Hiroshima City
KUROSAWA Mitsuru      Osaka University
MAEDA Tetsuo     Tokyo International University
MORITAKI Haruko   Hiroshima Alliance for Nuclear Weapons Abolition
NIKI Michiko YWCA of Japan
TAKEMURA Yasuko     Former Member of the House of Councilors
TANAKA Terumi Nihon Hidankyo
TSUCHIYAMA Hideo   Former President, Nagasaki University
TSURU Yasuko     Tokyo Gakugei University
UMEBAYASHI Hiromichi Peace Depot (Chair of the Committee)


Comments:

The focus of this year's Report Card is on how the Government of Japan (GOJ) responded to the US "Nuclear Posture Review" and gpreemptive strike strategyh policies that go clearly against nuclear abolition efforts. Unfortunately, the GOJ has taken few steps in addressing these in earnest. This shows the essence of the GOJ's diplomatic posture towards the US, which is consistent with the GOJfs acceptance of the US "War on Iraq."

The evaluation period provided opportune conditions for the GOJ to consider the establishment of the Northeast Asia Nuclear Weapon-Free Zone as a viable means to consolidate the Pyongyang Declaration. The suspicions that arose due to the nuclear weapon development in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea) were at the heart of the problem. Nevertheless, we could not find any signs that the GOJ would change its policy on the Northeast NWFZ. 

It is of our deep regret that ratings for the Item 5,6,9e are all Es - especially because these items are of paramount importance towards the path toward the nuclear abolition.

The GOJ's efforts to promote the entry-into-force of the CTBT as against the US and the issuance of the Pyongyang Declaration have led to the same total average rating as last year.

"Parliamentarian Network for Nuclear Disarmament-Japan" was established in July 2002. We hope that the Network would activate policy discussions. We will distribute this Report Card to the Network members

Explanation for Grading:  
A: Japan has tackled its core task of eliminating dependence on nuclear weapons, or has made a significant contribution for global nuclear disarmament.  
B: Japan has been enthusiastic in tackling the important tasks (underlined in the gExplanation of the Reason of Evaluationh).  
C: Japan has carried out some of the tasks.  
D: Japan carried out none or very few of the tasks. Fortunately, this did not constitute a direct factor setting back the global situation.
E: Japan carried out none of the important tasks. Or even if Japan carried out some of them, it failed to make the most of its precious opportunity as a country devastated by nuclear weapons.



Japanfs Report Card Evaluation Committee on Nuclear Disarmament
c/o Peace Depot
Hiyoshi Gruene 102, 3-3-1, Minowa-cho, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-0051, Japan
Phone: (81)45-563-5101 Fax: (81)45-563-9907 http://www.peacedepot.org



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